The 15 Most Important Home Design Impacts During Covid-19

February 09, 2021

The 15 Most Important Home Design Impacts During Covid-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a dramatic impact on our lives in so many ways.

One such area has been how we now view our homes and how we live, work and play in our homes going forward. 

How will our lifestyles change and affect What we do with our homes. It is hard to say but over the last few months we have been looking at some of the changes people are now making with the design of their homes.

What renovation ideas and trends are flowing through different homes and apartments.

 

Home Design Impacts from covid19

 

Our  homes have transitioned into makeshift offices, gyms, classrooms, restaurants, cocktail bars, concert venues, movie theaters, and more. With so many activities happening under one roof every day, small studio apartments and large family homes alike have had to adapt to incorporate new functionality.

Our homes are a space where we do have control over what we put in it, how we arrange it, and how it makes us feel It is a place where we want to feel comfortable, safe, and secure

1  Bold ideas

People are painting rooms bold colors, mixing patterns, leaning into new styles, and DIY-ing because they can.

We want excitement in our homes more than ever so we are taking risks and having less company over means design choices aren’t on display right away. 

We can sit with our ideas without feeling pressure to impress anyone which ultimately helps us figure out what we really love. This might be our favorite because feeling free in your home is how it should have always been.

2  Experiment

Confidence to try new things and experiment more is at an all-time high. 

We are seeing a lot of people “go for it” which is so refreshing and exciting. I saw so many DIY art pieces, headboards, murals, and even furniture in 2020 and hope that never ever changes.

But more so, we are seeing people tackle “harder” DIYs like lighting and tile installation because A. we are trying to stay safe and not have unnecessary people in our homes and B. saving money on things we are finding the confidence to be able to do ourselves leaves more money for the projects we need contractors for.

3  Home Office

Whether you are working from home, teaching from home, or learning from home there has been a SURGE in home office spaces. 

Numerous businesses have allowed staff  to work from home permanently  , or at least semi-permanently. So everyone is making considerable efforts to carve out office nooks or sections. 

This is happening with a lot of companies (especially those in the digital media world) and it helps to create zones so you can separate “work mode” and “binge-watching-the-crown-mode”.

Homeowners might be more interested in larger, more defined home offices as opposed to temporary desk setups, especially as some employers enable remote work permanently.

For those living in smaller spaces, multifunctional pieces such as drop-down desks or stylish office furniture that doubles as decor can help blend a work station into another room more seamlessly.

Speaking of working from home, the way that residential spaces are designed will expand to incorporate not only the physical experience but the virtual experience, too.

Lighting, acoustics, and striking the perfect balance of personal and professional will continue to be front of mind as the necessity of having a flexible, sometimes multi-functional, working space at home has made itself clear.

home office in living room

4  Comfort

Comfort and function are more of a priority and a lot of us are loving this new shift. 

We are feeling less pressure to have a “perfect” home and in general, we want to make the most out of the spaces we have.

Family rooms should be designed with comfort in mind, but an office or living room could be more bright and eclectic to inspire creativity.

It depends on individual needs and we are all paying more attention to those needs now.

People are reconsidering buying decisions, so those “special” sculptural chairs, they just aren’t great to sit in for an extended period of time which is a massive no-go when you are spending 99% of your time indoors and every inch is precious. 

Maybe this seems like common sense but no longer will we be buying pieces we don’t actually want to use. Comfort is king.

5  Entryways

Entryways became the spot to remove face masks and set down items that came into contact with germy surfaces before washing hands

These new habits will lead to a resurgence of mudrooms or alternate points of entry. "A place to remove shoes, jackets, or put down bags will help to mitigate germs and bacteria from entering the home,"


6  Living Sustainably & Quality Over Quantity

More time at home means higher utility bills! So who wouldn’t want to design to reduce energy consumption? 

Simple changes like what light bulbs you’re using to bigger investments like solar panels and better insulation can help keep home costs down

 

7  Zones

Creating zones is so important when you are home more than ever and for those renovating, an open concept layout may be a lot less appealing than in previous years. 

It’s simply not practical for stay-at-home life when your home is now an office, classroom, home gym, crafting studio (??), etc etc. The ability to shut a door has likely saved A LOT of relationships this past year.

For families isolating together, more time spent under one roof has highlighted the need for private spaces where each person can enjoy some alone time.

In addition to more formal home offices, this renewed focus on privacy could result in separate kids' bedrooms, designated reading nooks, and home layouts with distinct spaces rather than open floor plans.

During the quarantine, we’ve been forced to put a space between each other – and the outside world – to prevent spreading the virus. 

Separate space and rooms designated for different activities, and to help give families some breathing room, will become more and more important in design a home.

A separate “casita” or guest house suite can be useful for isolating someone that may be ill, or to provide more distance and privacy for guests.

Office spaces and study areas are more necessary than ever.  As more of us work (and learn) from home, a dedicated office and space for studying is essential. 

Many of us quickly had to convert areas and rooms to our own home offices – showing us the importance of a separate space. Homes with multiple areas for getting work done – offices, libraries, and study areas – will be even more popular in design.

Multiple areas for activities and entertainment, such as home gyms, media rooms, and game rooms will be necessary to keep everyone entertained.

Designate an area with a nice background (bookcases, artwork) and good lighting for Zoom meetings.

8  Online 

Ordering furniture or decor online brings up a whole set of anxieties and challenges. Especially with big ticket items such as sofas and coffee tables, we are all REALLY doing our research. 

We are reading reviews by people who have actually owned or tried out products for a period of time so we can be more confident in our buys. 

Some of us were already doing that but it’s shocking how many people don’t and then are disappointed when they get it delivered.

We are also collectively paying attention to important things like sustainability and company ethos so we know who and what we are supporting.

9  Cooking 

Experimenting with recipes has become a favorite new hobby for many sheltering in place, which has caused a revived interest in kitchen organization and design. 

"The frequency of cooking and how we purchase groceries have forced people to rethink how they organize and store food

We're reevaluating how to maximize the efficiency of the kitchen with all of its extra use." 

Expect to see more orderly kitchen storage, larger pantries, and specialty appliances, such as bread machines and cold-brew coffee machines, that help amateur chefs achieve restaurant-style results at home.

 

Designing a home after covid19

10  At Home Entertaining

Weeks of sheltering in place reinforced the idea that home is a safe space, and that logic is likely to continue as people begin to gather in person with family and friends again

The homes of friends and family members are controlled environments, making them an inviting option for safe and comfortable celebrations and gatherings." 

As the weather gets warmer, backyard barbecues and patio get-togethers provide a relatively safe way to enjoy the company of others in a private setting.

People are setting up living rooms in their backyard. people are trying to hold onto their outdoor living areas as long as possible. Smokeless fire pit inserts, outdoor heaters are big now, and they're quite affordable

Getting outside has been a saving grace for many during the pandemic, so prioritizing a sustainable place to relax and hang out for hours in the fresh air and sunshine could be the next big thing on your radar. 

Including nature in home design can be calming and serene, which is exactly what people need a bit more of. 

Whether people want a simple patio or a full sun room, bringing the nature in can make any home happier and more well-rounded.

11. Hygienic Surfaces

In the future, kitchens, bathrooms, and other high-traffic areas could be designed with easy-to-clean hard surfaces, such as glazed ceramic tile, and materials that naturally repel bacteria to limit the spread of germs.

No-touch technology in faucets and doorbells and increased home automation can also help reduce germs on frequently touched surfaces around the home.

There are few materials that we can use that are more sterile than others, and will be used even more in the future of design.

Metals such as copper, brasses, and bronzes are natural antimicrobial materials that have intrinsic properties to destroy a wide range of microorganisms. 

Not only are these metals hygienic, but they are great accents to warm up your home. 

Use copper, brass and bronze in faucets, door handles, and cabinet knobs – the places that are frequently touched.

Quartz is one of the hardest non-precious stones on earth, therefore countertops made from quartz are hard, stain and scratch-resistant, and the most sanitary. Quartz is already popular, and that will only increase post Coronavirus.

Woods like bamboo, oak and cork stop bacteria and microorganisms from growing. We love the look of warm lighter oak woods for flooring, and think this will continue to be a big trend in home design.

Plexiglass and non-porous materials, like copper, bronze, and brass, will now get their time to shine as integral elements in safe workspace design. 

Not only will these germ-resistant surfaces and materials make it easier to clean surfaces, but it will also cause germs to dissolve at an expedited rate.

 

cheese platter

 

12  At Home Entertaining

Weeks of sheltering in place reinforced the idea that home is a safe space, and that logic is likely to continue as people begin to gather in person with family and friends again

The homes of friends and family members are controlled environments, making them an inviting option for safe and comfortable celebrations and gatherings." 

As the weather gets warmer, backyard barbecues and patio get-togethers provide a relatively safe way to enjoy the company of others in a private setting.

People are setting up living rooms in their backyard. people are trying to hold onto their outdoor living areas as long as possible. Smokeless fire pit inserts, outdoor heaters are big now, and they're quite affordable

Getting outside has been a saving grace for many during the pandemic, so prioritizing a sustainable place to relax and hang out for hours in the fresh air and sunshine could be the next big thing on your radar. 

Including nature in home design can be calming and serene, which is exactly what people need a bit more of. 

Whether people want a simple patio or a full sun room, bringing the nature in can make any home happier and more well-rounded.

13. Calmness

Our living spaces greatly influence our physical health – as well as our emotional state of mind (especially during his time).

So it will continue to be important to create environments that stimulate our senses in a good way, improve relaxation, and have health and wellness benefits to the people using them. 

Here are a few ways of living that could take off:

Bringing in nature will be emphasized in many different ways. From larger windows with views outside and using colors that reflect the natural world. 

Having lots of greenery in a home is also an obvious and easy stimulant to our overall wellbeing (along with lots of health benefits).

An increase in organization. Being quarantined at home makes us realize what is really necessary. Clutter can cause anxiety and discomfort – feelings that are more unwanted than ever. Thus organization will be emphasized, through de-cluttering, smart storage, and built-in shelving and spaces for keeping items organized.

A sense of security and calm will definitely be present in interiors. When the world is full of uncertainty, having a space that feels like an escape from the outside world, with soft and cozy materials, light colors and relaxing vibes, will be a prerequisite of design.

Create a sense of relaxation in any space with an oil-diffuser. Try lavender for a sound sleep in the bedroom and peppermint in the office to stimulate productivity.

14 Mood Enhancing by Design

Spending hours on end in the same space is a guaranteed way to determine how your environment makes you feel.

Colours, shapes, textures, smells, these are all things that affect our mood.

Designing to enhance the desired mood of each room in your home is a must

 

15 Smart Home 

Voice and facial recognition are around, but such technology definitely has plans to grow in home design. 

Think of a door you open by asking it to when your hands are full, lights turn off please. Or how about sitting on the couch in the living room and telling the stove to pre-heat to 425°. 

Not to mention that the less you touch the fewer germs spread!


The majority of not all these trends or ideas will have a positive effect on people and the way they live in their homes.

 

Photo by Alberto Castillo Q. on Unsplash

Photo by Dan Gold on Unsplash

Photo by Collov Home Design on Unsplash

Photo by Luisa Brimble on Unsplash




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